ALADDIN
CENTER Carnegie Mellon UniversityCarnegie Mellon Computer Science DepartmentSchool of Computer Science
REU

Using Games to Solve Problems that Computers Cannot Yet Solve:

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       Collecting Common Sense Knowledge Using Variants of the Game TABOO

REU
Student

Graduate
Mentor

Faculty
Advisor

Mihir
Kedia

 

Collection of common sense data is an important problem in practice. Consider the following game. I have a word in my mind that I cannot say, but that I must get you to say. I give you multiple clues: "it is a white liquid," "it comes from cows," "we drink it for breakfast." Eventually, you guess "milk." Now imagine that I need to make you say milk without being able to say "milk," "cow," "white," or "liquid" myself. I probably give you clues such as "it has to be kept in the refrigerator," "it comes in a carton," et cetera. This is the game of TABOO. The amazing thing about this game is that I must say several "common sense" things about "milk" that a computer might not know.

This project will investigate collecting common sense knowledge by having people play an online variant of this game. The REU student will help to build prototype games, as well as think about the different components the game should have. The student will learn about open problems in Artificial Intelligence and why current techniques donít work well to solve them. The student will also learn how to design interactive systems that entice people to contribute to the solution of the problems at hand, the importance of usability, and how to design games for which adversaries cannot cheat. The most important prerequisite is strong experience in programming Java.

Preliminary Presentation (ppt)
Final Presentation (ppt)

 

This material is based upon work supported by National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0122581.
Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the
National Science Foundation